Q&A Part 2: You’ve decided Yes!: How Best to Apply to Graduate School

Thanks for continuing to read about the “Path to Graduate School.” Here are answers to questions 9, 10, and 11 finishing up our second category, “I decided, Yes! How best to apply to grad school.” Next week we will post questions 11 and 12 from the next category “You got in: How to survive graduate school.”

Question 9: Can I get my graduate degree from an institution outside the U.S.?

Flags

 The basic answer here: YES.

“Yes you can. You just have to do the research and figure out what the requirements are for foreign institutions.” – Myriam Telus

 “Most definitely. Europe in particular has many well-funded institutions with good research opportunities.” – anonymous

“Yes. Europe and Australia have good programs, however the U.S. is still, in my opinion, the top.” – Saulo Soares 6th Year PhD Physical Oceanography

“YES” – Astrid Leitner 1st Year PhD Biological Oceanographer

 “Yes.” – Joy Leilei Shih 5th Year PhD Marine Geology and Geochemistry

 Some received their Bachelor’s degree or Master’s degree outside of the US and came to UH from there:

“I got my undergraduate from a Canadian school. It makes transferring during your degree almost impossible, but the degree stands up in other places and international tuition can still be much cheaper than US universities. Make sure the university is still well known outside of the country.” – Sarah Maher 3rd year MS Geology and Geophysics

“I went to England for a Masters and came back to UH for a PhD.  I highly recommend international (if you are willing to pay the $$$) because it is a great experience.” – Samantha Weaver 1st Year PhD Geology and Geophysics

Question 10: How many programs should I apply to?

Basically, do your research on the different programs and apply to as many as you are interested in and would actually go to if you get accepted:

 “As many as you have the patience for and the money for applications for. Don’t settle though! only apply to places where you actually want to go and are interested in the research” – Astrid Leitner 1st Year PhD Biological Oceanographer

 “If you find that 5-6 programs have what you want and people you want to work with, then I would apply to all 6.  If you are only really interested in 3 programs, then apply to 3.

Apply to as many programs that fit your goals and would be realistic options for what you envision your grad school experience to be.” – Allison Fong 6th Year PhD Biological Oceanography – Microbial Ecology

“As many as you are interested in. I only applied to one because I knew I wanted to work in that particular lab.” – Michelle Jungbluth 1st Year PhD Biological Oceanography

“It does not necessarily depend on the program.  It depends more on who you want to work with:  look at the research that the faculty are doing, talk with current students to get their opinion on their adviser…do YOUR research on the program and the adviser.” – Samantha Weaver 1st Year PhD Geology and Geophysics

“As much as you can and want” – Alma Carolina Castillo 3rd Year PhD Physical Oceanography

“3-4. And don’t apply blindly.  Establish a connection with a potential advisor before applying. The applications are reviewed in a committee and if they recognize a name, your application is more likely to be picked out of a crowd.” – Shimi Rii 4th Year PhD Biological Oceanography

“Apply to the top three schools you are interested in.” – Myriam Telus

“I applied to 5 universities for my degree. Applications can get expensive, but it can be worth it to make sure that you have options in the end. Of the 5 I applied for, 3 accepted me and 2 made stipend offers. Make sure the places you apply are ones that you would be willing to live, and that the department seems like a good fit.” – Sarah Maher 3rd year MS Geology and Geophysics

“As many as you want.” – anonymous

“At least 4. You should have a “”top choice”” that is far reaching, two that are reasonably within your experience level, and one that is a “”fall back”” school.” – Kendra Lynn 2nd Year PhD Volcanology, Geochemistry and Petrology

“4 or 5.” – Joy Leilei Shih 5th Year PhD Marine Geology and Geochemistry

“I applied to five:  four that I was very interested in and were tops in my field, and one that was more of a “”back up,”” though there are no guarantees when applying for grad school.  That fifth school lost my application and it never got processed!  Good thing I got in other places.  Better to apply to a handful and try to have meaningful communication with potential advisors than apply to twenty and be just a face in the crowd.” – Emily First 3rd Year PhD Experimental Petrology

“3-4 is a good number (at least). Not sure.” – Saulo Soares 6th Year PhD Physical Oceanography

Question 11: Should I apply for a master’s or doctoral degree program?

Most said that it depends where you see yourself in the future, and it depends how confident you are that a Ph.D. will be necessary for your future:

“Loaded question. This really depends on why you want to go to graduate school and what sort of job you might want to end up in afterwards. Do some research. Talk to some people. If you just want to try, start with a M.S., since Ph.D. is a long commitment.

Check out some of these links:

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2013/10/17/back-to-school-why-choose-a-phd

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2013/10/18/the-involuntary-phd” – Shimi Rii 4th Year PhD Biological Oceanography

“If you want to go into academia or if the job you want requires a doctoral degree then, get a doctoral degree. If you are not sure what job you want, but you are sure what field you want to work in, get a masters (you can always switch to a doctoral during your masters if you want). If you are not sure at all, get an internship.” – Myriam Telus

“Depends on the end goal and field. A master’s degree is a good stepping stone if unsure.” – Joy Leilei Shih 5th Year PhD Marine Geology and Geochemistry

“If you know you want to get a doctorate in the end, you can skip the masters and directly apply, though you might have a better chance of getting accepted if you already have a masters.” – Sarah Maher 3rd year MS Geology and Geophysics

“Depends!  I came to Hawaii as a Master’s student and recently decided to switch to a PhD.  At first, I wasn’t sure I could handle the commitment of so much more school, and I thought I would want to be back on the mainland and closer to family after a couple years.  But I love my work and the people in my department, and have realized I’d like to continue in academia– for that, I need a PhD 😉 A lot of my friends have switched from one to the other (and sometimes back again).  Not to say that’s recommended, but if the program offers both degrees, it’s usually negotiable after you start your studies (pending funding, as always).” – Emily First 3rd Year PhD Experimental Petrology

“Up to you.  If you feel like you are ready to commit to 7 years of hard work, living on a graduate student salary, love research and are sure you want to do research for 7 years – PhD.

Anything else – Masters” – Astrid Leitner 1st Year PhD Biological Oceanographer

 A few recommended starting with a Master’s, you can always do a Ph.D. afterwards:

“Start with a M.S. if you’re not sure of what you want to do. Otherwise, both are good.” – Kendra Lynn 2nd Year PhD Volcanology, Geochemistry and Petrology

“M.S.” – anonymous

“I personally think it is valuable to start with a Master’s.  Not only do you potentially get an extra publication or two out of it (I got 3 from my Masters work), but you also may realize what you do want to do and that it may not require a PhD.  A surprising number of students do not complete PhD programs.” – Michelle Jungbluth 1st Year PhD Biological Oceanography

“In my opinion start at the MS level to see if you like the academic research environment. You can always continue, switch universities, or work for a bit afterward.” – anonymous

“Most places start you in a master’s track. Then you can try to advance straight to PhD.  Unless you are sure you want an academic life or you really need a PhD, start with a master’s.” – Saulo Soares 6th Year PhD Physical Oceanography

One person recommended going directly for the Ph.D. without question! You can always take a step back to a Master’s if you decide the Ph.D. is not for you:

“Doctoral and if you dont like change to master” – Alma Carolina Castillo 3rd Year PhD Physical Oceanography

Graduate

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s