Q&A Part 3: You got in! How to survive grad school

Thanks for continuing to read about the “Path to Graduate School.” We have a new category, Part 3: “You got in! How to survive grad school!” Here are answers to questions 12 and 13, and we will post questions 14-15 next week, finishing up our Q&A session! Hope this has been helpful to all of you!

Question 12: I got into a graduate program! Should I take time off before starting graduate studies?

trave-the-worldhttp://www.etravelblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/trave-the-world.jpg

Some say yes:

“yes” – Alma Carolina Castillo 3rd Year PhD Physical Oceanography

“It depends on your personal circumstances. If you’re feeling burned out or have personal things to take care of, take a semester/year off. If you’re feeling ready for it, jump right in!” – Kendra Lynn 2nd Year PhD Volcanology, Geochemistry and Petrology

“Yes.  Recharge your battery, get in some travel and relaxation time to prepare yourself for the rigors of grad school.” – Allison Fong 6th Year PhD Biological Oceanography – Microbial Ecology

“Sure, if you can.” – Saulo Soares 6th Year PhD Physical Oceanography

“YES” – Astrid Leitner 1st Year PhD  Biological Oceanographer

Some suggest that it is not worth putting off:

“why?” – anonymous 

“You will likely find out whether you got accept in March-May, but you will not start grad school until August/September. You can use the summer before grad school as the “”time off””. If you need more time off for whatever reason, talk to the folks in your department about that and check if it is okay with them.” – Myriam Telus

“Depends on the reason. It doesn’t necessarily hurt, but I don’t think there’s a benefit either.” – Joy Leilei Shih 5th Year PhD Marine Geology and Geochemistry

“Why put it off?” – Sarah Maher 3rd year MS Geology and Geophysics

“Not necessarily if you are eager to continue coursework, research, etc. and really like the academic environment.” – anonymous

Question 13: What are the best tips for surviving grad school?

survive-grad-school-part2(1)

http://www.universityaffairs.ca/how-to-survive-your-first-year-of-graduate-school-part-2.aspx

My personal favorite answer:

“thats what I want to know…” – anonymous

But more seriously, it is important to maintain a BALANCE between work and your social life:

“Have friends and hobbys.” – Alma Carolina Castillo 3rd Year PhD Physical Oceanography

“Balance. You must have balance. A graduate degree is a big investment of your time, energy, emotions, and intellect. You cannot expect to be productive working 24/7 for four years – there has to be a balance so that you can appreciate the work you’re doing. Make sure to take time to sleep, eat properly, socialize occasionally, and work hard when the situation calls for it.” – Kendra Lynn 2nd Year PhD Volcanology, Geochemistry and Petrology

“My #1 tip: become friends with your cohorts and get mentors. Grad school, especially your first year with all the classes, is all about comaraderie and students helping each other out.  Be friends with the technicians in your labs. They will help you tremendously.

My #2 tip: Allow yourself to relax.  Manage your time wisely and allow yourself to pick up a hobby that lets you blow off steam or not think about grad school for an hour. Be it yoga, sport, art, hiking, etc., take care of your well-being for a healthy lifestyle.

Also check out this link:

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2013/10/09/graduate-school-survival-skills” – Shimi Rii 4th Year PhD Biological Oceanography

“Relax, do your best. Maintain broad interests but still focus on what you are doing.” – Saulo Soares 6th Year PhD Physical Oceanography

“Work hard and play hard.  You work a lot as a grad. student, but make sure that you have other activities in your life so you don’t feel stuck in research and come to despise it.  I joined a paddling team.  It opened up my social circle and it’s a very fun way of exercising.” – Samantha Weaver 1st Year PhD Geology and Geophysics

“Dont fall behind, stay organized, develop a good relationship with colleagues, lab mates, and your advisor.  GO TO THE BEACH – mental health days are clutch” – Astrid Leitner 1st Year PhD Biological Oceanographer

“Strike a balance between school, social life, and rest.” – Joy Leilei Shih 5th Year PhD Marine Geology and Geochemistry

Other general tips: stay focused, take ownership of your work, communicate with your advisor and classmates, and work hard:

“Stay focused on what you want to get out of it all.  It wasn’t meant to be easy, it also wasn’t meant for everyone to do.  There will be times when you question why you started, but the rewards should outweigh the costs and you need to see the light at the end of the tunnel.” – Michelle Jungbluth 1st Year PhD Biological Oceanography

“Choose an advisor you will enjoy working with because you will have to deal with this person on a regular basis.” – Myriam Telus

“Grad school is a marathon, not a sprint.  Don’t treat it like undergrad, where you just need to pass the classes; take ownership of your project.” – Donn Viviani 4th Year PhD Biological Oceanography

“Be self motivated. Make a timeline and stick to it, because nobody is going to do your work for you.” – Sarah Maher 3rd year MS Geology and Geophysics

“Be proactive with respect to your classes and research. Be honest with your advisor. Work hard.” – anonymous

“Study with classmates.  Go to faculty if you have questions about the material and need further explanation.  Build a good working relationship with your adviser.  Learn to manage your time and energy efficiently.  Build and invest in a support network.” – Allison Fong 6th Year PhD Biological Oceanography – Microbial Ecology

“Just keep swimming. Let it be. Keep a positive mindset. Live Aloha. And, work your darn booty off!” – Christine Waters 3rd Year PhD Geology and Geophysics

Thank you for checking out the answers to Q 12 and 13! We will post the answers to our last 2 questions next week! Happy New Year!

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