Inspiring future discoveries and changing the world

Here is our second entry of our 1st SOESTblog Writing Contest “What drives you?”! Each week, contestants will share what drives them to do their research day in and day out. Each article will be posted for 1 week and winners will be determined by the most # of reads on the site! Help Michelle this week by sharing her article!

 

Screen Shot 2015-04-10 at 9.28.17 AMContributed by Michelle Jungbluth

 

What is it that scientists really do? And what drives them to do it?

The life of a scientist is not as straightforward as you might think. To the left is a list of 18 things I am expected to do as a graduate student scientist— in addition to the necessary daily human activities such as grocery shopping, maintaining personal relationships, and keeping my apartment clean.

Given that outrageous list, I sometimes feel that there aren’t enough hours in the day  So what keeps me going?

By being endlessly curious!

I love being out on the waves, feeling the sets roll in, seeing the blue-green of the water. What makes it even better is to know what caused those waves and what shapes them, how the smell and color of the sea is related to recent rainfall in the area, that the little moving specks in the water are actually living, breathing plankton that fuel healthy ocean ecosystems.

I would not be happy working in the office all day, every day, crunching numbers or making phone calls. I would not be fulfilled as a veterinarian, neutering animals half of the week and seeing sick animals the other half of the week. I would not be satisfied working with laboratory animals, born to a life in a cage living far from their natural habitats. I know these things because I have experience with them and decided that I wanted more. It is only through experience that you can truly decide if a career path is right for you, and I am thankful, and have deep respect for everyone who has been a part of these prior experiences.

The moment I decided to move to Hawaii with my scientist husband, Sean Jungbluth was life-changing. That is when I discovered my love for oceanography (and copepods!). Some of what drives me is the diversity in that long list of responsibilities I just gave. The inherent challenges in that list keep me feeling fulfilled, most of the time.

The less tangible outcomes of my work are also what drive me to keep at it. As a scientist, the work I do now and in the future could impact the world in so many ways:

  • Inspire future generations to be scientists; despite that long list of challenging work, my science includes a lot of fun; sometimes I get to cross the equator on a British Antarctic icebreaker, and chase storms for my research
  • Be the basis for future discoveries!
  • I could, if I’m very lucky and work hard enough, make a discovery that illuminates or changes our relationship to the world around us!

When I feel discouraged, or when an experiment does not go as planned, these are the things that inspire me to push onward.

Me at the 2013 SOEST Open House, where I helped create an exhibit teaching schoolchildren and families about zooplankton, hoping to inspire future generations!

Me at the 2013 SOEST Open House, where I helped create an exhibit teaching schoolchildren and families about zooplankton, hoping to inspire future generations!

I am thankful for the hundreds of people who have been my teachers or mentors throughout my life so far. From my parents and grandparents, to all my teachers in the 20+ years of K-12, college, and graduate education, my employers over the years, and the past and present scientists who inspire me. It is due to your inspiration that I am driven to be who I am, and do what I do every day.

 

Liked Michelle’s article? Share her post today!

 


 

Michelle Jungbluth is a PhD candidate in the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. She uses traditional and novel molecular techniques to study plankton food web interactions and the importance of highly abundant larval copepods in marine ecosystems. She is also a co-founder of the Science Communicators ‘Ohana and a Teaching Assistant for Introductory Oceanography OCN 201 at UH Manoa.

 

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